Roundtable on Global Governance: Challenges & Opportunities

Global Governance: Challenges & Opportunities
A Roundtable & Planning Workshop

Inter-University Centre, Dubrovnik – November 22-24, 2018

The world we live in presents challenges and opportunities beyond the capacity of even the strongest, most developed nations or group of nations to effectively address without working in concert with the rest of humanity. Peace and security, climate and environmental management, immigration and population, trade and investment, technological development and employment, tax evasion and money-laundering, drug traffic and terrorism compel us to seek global solutions backed by institutions with the capacity and authority to conceive, implement and enforce them. None of these issues can be effectively addressed at the level of individual nation states pursuing their own self-interest in competition or conflict with that of other nations or by bilateral agreements or regional groups of nations. All necessitate increasing and unprecedented levels of cooperation and collaboration by the global community as a whole.

We live in an increasingly globalized world, yet our instruments of governance remain anchored in antiquated, flawed and largely ineffective national level institutions guided by narrow perspectives, misguided priorities, competitive strategies and mutually exclusive objectives. Global governance remains an artificial appendage or after-thought forged by the compulsions of necessity rather than consciously conceived and designed as an integral and essential component of a comprehensive and effective system for human self-governance.

Humanity and its institutions have, no doubt, evolved dramatically from the time a few centuries ago when international relations were decided by the whims of monarchs and ambitions of colonial empires, enforced by the exercise or threat of violence, enshrined in bilateral treaties and alliances, modified to suit the apparent advantages of the moment, and founded on principles of self-interest and balance of power. Today the world is governed by myriad institutions at innumerable levels, including international governmental institutions, charters, conventions, treaties, rules of law, committees, systems, multinational and national corporations, non-governmental organizations and associations relating to peace, security, justice, trade, economy, finance, transport, communication, education, science, technology, culture, religion, entertainment and other fields.

In spite of this multiplication of pathways and instruments for governance, the rapid evolution of global society continues to outpace the development of institutions to guide, monitor and manage the increasing range and magnitude of the opportunities and challenges that arise. The growing gap between the needs of humanity and its prevailing system of institutions severely retards our collective progress and threatens to undermine the foundations of peace, security, freedom and stability on which the gains of the post-World War II and post-Cold War world have been achieved.

This three-day roundtable cum PG course will explore the recent challenges and opposition to the continued evolution of global governance to identify the key drivers of global social evolution, critical obstacles and impediments, the most desirable goals and effective strategies to further progress toward their realization. It will build on insights derived during the Dubrovnik Roundtable on the Future of Democracy (April 2018) and the Paris Colloquium on the role of international organizations in global economic governance (May 2018). It will seek to draw insights from multiple fields—economy, politics, law, human rights, civil society, media, education, science, technology, psychology and culture—and explore the interdependences between them.

Organized by

World Academy of Art & Science

An international think tank composed of 730 individual Fellows from diverse cultures, nationalities, and intellectual disciplines, WAAS serves as a forum for addressing the pressing challenges confronting humanity today founded on faith in the power of original and creative ideas to change the world—Leadership in Thought that Leads to Action. Its mission is to promote cross-disciplinary dialogue generative of original ideas and integrated perspectives that comprehend the root causes and effective remedies for our common problems while furthering those currents of thought and social movement that affirm the value of human dignity and equitable development.

World University Consortium

The mission of World University Consortium is to evolve and promote development of accessible, affordable, quality higher education worldwide based on a human-centered approach that shifts the emphasis from specialized expertise to contextualized knowledge within a trans-disciplinary conceptual framework reflecting the complexity and integration of the real world, from teaching mastery of a field of knowledge to learning that enhances the capacity of students to think and discover knowledge for themselves, from theoretical mastery to acquisition of knowledge, skills and values relevant to each individual’s personal development and career.

Dag Hammarskjöld University College of International Relations and Diplomacy

The Dag Hammarskjöld University College of International Relations and Diplomacy is the leading institution for training experts in the field of international relations and diplomacy in Croatia. It trains students by developing their competencies for research, creation, implementation and active management of international relations, which should ensure a better quality of life for people in the Republic of Croatia, in the region and in the world.

Inter-University Centre

IUC, Croatia, is an independent international institution for advanced studies structured as a consortium of universities with a mission to organise and promote contact and exchange across a wide range of subjects.

The Mother’s Service Society

A social science research and educational institution in India, MSS conducts original research on the process of individual, organizational, national and international development.

Person-Centered Approach Institute

The Person-Centered Approach Institute (IACP), is a scientific non-profit organization operating internationally and dedicated to the protection and promotion of human capital, offering training, research and consulting services with the various applications of the Person-Centered Approach, a scientifically validated method formulated by one of the founders, the late Carl Rogers. IACP post-graduate trainings are recognized by the Italian Ministry of Education. IACP is an approved provider of continuing education courses by the Italian Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Education.

For more information contact support@worldacademy.org.

Global Governance: Challenges & Opportunities
A Roundtable & Planning Workshop

Inter-University Centre, Dubrovnik – November 22-24, 2018

Tentative Questions to be explored in the Global Governance Roundtable

Session 1: Introduction

Session 2: Catalysts and Drivers for Global Governance – past and future

  • What have been the principal factors driving the evolution of global society over the past century?
  • What are the most likely drivers for the future evolution of global governance?

Session 3: Global Governance and Human Welfare

  • What have been the collective benefits generated by the evolution of global governance?
  • What are the most important lessons that have been learned from the process?
  • What opportunities have been generated by global systems for communication, transportation, exchange of goods and information, economic development, scientific and technological progress, social and personal relationships?
  • What are the potential benefits of enhancing and accelerating its development?
  • What conditions must be met for global governance to enhance human welfare?
  • Why are regional or global governance regimes seen as detrimental to human welfare in some countries, triggering a nationalist backlash?
  • What are the main obstacles to a global governance reform dedicated to human welfare?

Session 4: Global Governance Challenges

  • Challenges posed by rapid and uneven technological advances, depletion of resources, pollution, political instability, militarization and armed confrontation, migration, unemployment, inequality and multi-culturalism

Session 5: Failures, Obstacles and Unresolved Problems

  • What have been the most serious failures of global governance and the reasons for them?
  • Apparent failures and unresolved problems that obstruct the future development of the global community

Session 6: National Sovereignty and Global Governance

  • What is the relationship between the development of the nation state and the global community?
  • What conflicts does it generate and under what conditions can they be reconciled?

Session 7: Global Rule of Law and Universal Human Rights

  • The role of international law in the evolution of global governance
  • The evolution and role of universalized recognized human rights

Session 8: Role of Academia and Civil Society in the evolution of Global Governance

  • What is the role of academia and civil society in the evolution of global governance and how can it be made more effective?

Session 9 & 10: Small Group Discussions & Report of Discussion Groups

Session 11: Role of business & economy in the evolution of Global Governance

  • What is the role of business and economy in the evolution of global governance?
  • How can its positive potentials be more fully harnessed?
  • How can its negative contributions be minimized?

Session 12: Strategies to enhance and accelerate effective governance of the globe

  • What have been the most successful strategies applied to further progress at the global level?
  • What new or alternative strategies should be applied to achieve these objectives?
  • What strategies can be adopted to more effectively address current threats, bottlenecks, impasses and opposition?

Session 13: Viable pathways for the transition of global society to a more peaceful, prosperous and sustainable future for all humanity

  • What are the likely benefits and risks of increasing movement toward global governance?
  • What would be the most beneficial ultimate objectives of the evolution of global governance?

Session 14: Discussion
Session 15: Conclusions & Recommendations

Global Governance: Challenges & Opportunities
A Roundtable & Planning Workshop

Inter-University Centre, Dubrovnik – November 22-24, 2018

Schedule of Lectures

November 22, 2018

No.

TOPIC

MODERATORS/PANELISTS

TIMING

1

Introduction

Heitor Gurgulino de Souza
Garry Jacobs

9:00 AM – 9:30 AM

2

Catalysts and Drivers for Global Governance – past and future

Alberto Zucconi
Stefan Brunnhuber

9:30 AM – 11:00 AM

3

Global Governance and Human Welfare

Thomas Reuter
Elif Çepni

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM

4

Global Governance Challenges

Tibor Tóth
Zlatko Lagumdžija*

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

5

Failures, Obstacles and Unresolved Problems

Fadwa El Guindi
Nebojša Nešković

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

November 23, 2018

6

National Sovereignty and Global Governance

Emil Constantinescu
Goran Bandov

9:00 AM – 10:30 AM

7

Global Rule of Law and Universal Human Rights

Winston Nagan
Momir Đurović*

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM

8

Role of Civil Society in the evolution of Global Governance

Marcel van de Voorde
Olivia Bina

1:30 PM – 3:00 PM

9

Small Discussion Groups

 

3:15 PM – 4:15 PM

10

Reports from the Discussion Groups

 

4:15 PM – 5:00 PM

November 24, 2018

11

Role of Business and Economy in the evolution of Global Governance

Zbigniew Bochniarz
Erich Hoedl

9:00 AM – 10:30 AM

12

Strategies to enhance and accelerate effective governance of the Globe

Rodolfo Fiorini
Carlos Alvarez-Pereira

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM

13

Viable pathways for the transition of global society

John Bunzl
Donato Kiniger-Passigli*

1:30 PM – 3:00 PM

14

Discussion

 

3:30 PM – 4:30 PM

15

Conclusions & Recommendations

 

4:30 PM – 5:00 PM

Global Governance: Challenges & Opportunities
A Roundtable & Planning Workshop

Inter-University Centre, Dubrovnik – November 22-24, 2018

COURSE DIRECTORS

Goran Bandov,
Vice Dean, Dag Hammarskjöld University College of International Relations and Diplomacy, Zagreb

Garry Jacobs,
CEO, World Academy of Art & Science and World University Consortium

Winston Nagan,
Chairman, WAAS Board of Trustees; Emeritus Professor of Law, University of Florida, USA

Alberto Zucconi,
President, Person-Centered Approach Institute (IACP), Italy; Secretary General, World University Consortium