New Paradigm of Sustainable Human Development. G-Global – a new form of global dialogue

 

Al-Farabi Kazakh National University

World University Consortium

Conference on New paradigm of Sustainable Human Development
G-Global – a new form of global dialogue
Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty, Kazakhstan

November 5-7, 2014

The Almaty conference was organized by the World Academy of Art & Science, World University Consortium and Al-Farabi Kazakh National University in partnership with a consortium of leading international organizations, research institutes and universities to examine the theoretical foundations and policy framework for a new paradigm in human development capable of addressing the pressing challenges confronting humanity today. The conference consisted of four trans-disciplinary, inter-related  tracks focusing on issues related to governance, international security, human rights and law; economy, finance and employment; education and human development; and energy, resources and climate. This conference builds on the proceedings of about a dozen recent conferences exploring the limitations of current theory and public policy and viable alternative approaches.

Conference Concept Note | Conference Agenda | Papers | Resolution | Photos | Videos

Conference on New paradigm of Sustainable Human Development
G-Global – a new form of global dialogue

Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty, Kazakhstan

November 5-7, 2014

Concept Note

Building on the recent preparatory conference of New Paradigm at Baku on April 30, 2014, this note outlines further steps being taken to promote collaboration among a group of leading international organizations to develop the theoretical, institutional and policy framework for a comprehensive, integrated paradigm for human development. A three day conference was held in collaboration with Al-Farabi Kazakh National University at Almaty, Kazakhstan on November 5-7, 2014 and a two day conference in collaboration with Nizami Ganjavi International Centre is scheduled to be held in Baku, Azerbaijan on April 29-30, 2015.

The Almaty conference built on the conclusions of recent conferences and on-going initiatives, including the Baku conference in April 2014, the trans-disciplinary discussion at Dubrovnik in September 2014 and work in progress on new economic theory. This conference examined core elements of an alternative paradigm at the level of theory, institutions and public policies. The conclusions of this conference will constitute the basis for the Baku conference in April 2015 focusing on conditions, strategies and steps for the transition to a new paradigm. This note presents the overview of steps taken to date, a conceptual overview of the project, organizers and co-organizers of the Almaty conference, main conference themes and a provisional agenda.

The accelerated pace of change in the global economic, political, technological, scientific, social and environmental spheres, growing complexity of the interactions and increasing integration of inter-dependencies between these spheres present unparalleled challenges to human security, welfare and well-being. Persistent poverty combined with rising levels of unemployment, inequality, social unrest, armed conflict, resource depletion and climate instability are symptomatic. These challenges have defied solution by piecemeal, sectoral strategies based on existing concepts and national level policy initiatives.  

The current socio-economic-political-juridical paradigm is unsustainable. It is destroying natural, human and social capitals and obstructing the evolution of essential institutions for global governance and human welfare. A change of course is essential. Faulting current approaches has so far proven insufficient to bring about a significant change in thinking and action. The potential upside of alternative futures has not been sufficiently documented or projected. The call for a fundamental paradigm change is now accepted by many leading thinkers and institutions, but the precise nature of the change required and the process by which it can be brought about are yet to be defined. A comprehensive strategy is needed to substantiate that practical and effective solutions are possible to successfully address global challenges, backed by quantified research and reliable measures of the desired outcomes.

Over the past 15 months, the World Academy has organized a series of conferences at the United Nations in Geneva, Library of Alexandria, Academy for Developing World (Trieste), Montenegrin Academy of Sciences and Arts(Podgorica), University of California at Berkeley, Washington DC, Ottawa and Baku on solutions to the current global crises. These meetings have involved a detailed exploration of the limitations of current theory and public policy and formulation of a broad approach to develop a viable alternative paradigm. In addition WAAS and Club of Rome have been individually and collectively engaged in examining core elements of New Economic Theory and formulation of a trans-disciplinary science of human development. Earth Dialogues Conference organised by Green Cross International last September in Geneva, Club of Rome's annual conference on the Global Commons in Ottawa in October 2013 and its upcoming meeting on Energy in Mexico City in October 2014, and Club de Madrid's two recent conferences on Shared Societies all address important issues related to the quest for a new paradigm.

Participants from about a dozen leading international NGOs have agreed to pool their complementary capabilities in a collaborative endeavor to generate viable solutions. The group includes World Academy of Art & Science, World University Consortium, Club de Madrid, Club of Rome, European Leadership Network, European Movement International, Future World Foundation, Green Cross International, Institute for Cultural Diplomacy, Library of Alexandria, Nizami Ganjavi International Center, Partnership for Change, and Pugwash. All these organizations confirm the need for a major paradigm change encompassing social, economic and political spheres. They agree that a human-centered, holistic approach is required capable of addressing all dimensions of the crises concurrently and sequentially, while maintaining and preserving all aspects of the measure of their continuing value to humanity. They also agree that effective action will require a wide range of expertise and that a consortium of organizations with a common vision, shared values and complementary capabilities can achieve far more than the sum of the results that may issue from their separate individual initiatives. Collaborative initiatives constitute an important base of power to promote emergence of a new paradigm.

Focal Points for the New Paradigm Project

Formulation and implementation of a new human-centered, ecologically sustainable development paradigm will require initiatives at many different levels. They will require the collaboration of different organizations which possess expertise applicable to addressing the issues at one or more of the following important focal points:

1. Values: A change in paradigm implies a change in the values that drive our thought and action. The work of all consortium members converges on the need for a fundamental clarification and change in values. Clarification will bring to the fore the universal moral and ethical principles essential for development of a free and equitable human community. But values are not merely idealistic principles. They offer essential guidance regarding the conditions for continuous improvement in the prospects for humanity. Efforts by WAAS and the Club of Rome to identify the values which are essential for global society to overcome the present challenges provide a foundation that can be built on. This should be combined with research into the circumstances and process by which significant changes in civilizational values have been brought about in the past and the possible actions by which a value change can now be consciously effected.

2. Theoretical Framework: A new paradigm needs also to be based on a wider conception and more profound perception of the interdependence and interdetermination of activities, complexity of interactions, global scope and reach, and central role of human beings in determining their own future. Economic growth is a grossly inadequate notion for charting humanity’s future. Without a wider conception of human development and the social processes by which it is effected, we are likely to find ourselves largely confined by existing concepts to prevailing policy options. The Academy is already collaborating with other organizations on efforts to frame New Economic Theory and to frame the outlines for an integrated trans-disciplinary science of society that can serve as the nucleus for development of a new conceptual framework. A working group meeting is scheduled for August 25 to September 6, 2014 in Dubrovnik.

3. Deep Drivers:  Society evolves. Every paradigm change involves a movement of the society-at-large along a values-pathway driven by deeper social forces pressing to emerge on the surface. These emerging deep drivers provide the energy and effective power for a change in direction. Recent WAAS conferences at the UN in Geneva, Library of Alexandria, Podgorica, Washington and Ottawa have made a significant beginning with analysis of deep drivers of future change. Additional work is needed to complete the list and examine the implications of these underlying forces that are already preparing global society today for a change of paradigm. It is important to recognize that the energy which moves the deep drivers is ultimately rooted in individual human beings acting individually and/or collectively.

4. Comprehensive Strategy: Participating organizations have already identified many essential institutional changes and policy initiatives applicable to different sectors and levels of global society. World Future Council’s Global Action Plan which was presented at the Baku conference is an excellent example of the comprehensive and inclusive approach that is needed. But thus far these represent separate pieces rather than a clear and coherent road map for the future. As all dimensions of global society contribute to the current dilemma, it is necessary to show how a comprehensive strategy will impact on both individual elements and their mutually dependent interactions and what would be the overall impact of implementation on human security, welfare and well-being.  It is essential that the strategy must itself be informed by a comprehensive focus of inquiry.

5. Quantitative Analysis: Quantification is a powerful tool for effective communication, as the impact of Limits to Growth 40 years ago testifies. Quantification and modelling can provide compelling evidence capable of altering public opinion and garnering political will. The development of a comprehensive roadmap could serve as the basis for an effort to quantify the potential benefits of a radical change of course on the future of national and global society.  As Club of Rome leveraged the World3 model to provide a quantitative picture of long term resource consumption, effort is needed to quantify the impact of a comprehensive blueprint on human security, welfare and well-being.

6. New Measures: A new paradigm will require more appropriate measures for monitoring human progress. Without new measures, we will remain trapped within the current framework which regards growth as synonymous with human development. Reconceptualizing progress as a movement toward higher levels of sustainable human welfare and security, rather than simply and crudely as a movement toward higher levels of unsustainable growth and consumption would constitute an important contribution when combined with a comprehensive strategy to achieve it and quantitative projections regarding the results. A review is needed of the wide range of alternative measures already developed to identify the most effective index for evaluating progress toward a new paradigm.

7. Public Awareness & Support: These elements will only generate significant impact when they are projected to the public-at-large through effective strategies for communication, education, dissemination and debate. World University Consortium is addressing the more fundamental challenge of how to realign national and global higher education to support transition to a new paradigm. Strategy is also needed to build on the approaches developed by Club of Rome, Partnership for Change, European Movement International and other participants and consider other innovative approaches, such as a global referendum, to impact on global public opinion.

8. Political Will: The goal of new theory, strategy, measures, quantitative analysis and public education must be to effect the functioning of public and private institutions as well as the formulation and implementation of policies by governments, the private sector and other institutions of civil society. Political will focuses on changing the perspective and mobilizing the support of individuals in different organizational roles to influence and direct a new set of global public expectations about the future of the human prospect. A comprehensive approach must include a strategy for influencing public discourse and political action. Club de Madrid possesses rich experience and expertise that can make a valuable contribution to evolution of effective political strategy.

9. Plan of Action: In order to ensure the necessary grounding in reality and to achieve the concentrated intensity required for significant impact, all these elements need to be directed and translated into a plan of ACTION designed to effect real change at the practical level. This involves assembling all that we know under each of the eight headings discussed above to identify important elements that have already been fully formulated, those that may be sought elsewhere, and those that are yet to be developed. The plan may include a global decision seminar on the most vital issues of paradigm change, comprehensive strategies, innovative methods of measurement, and creating global communications networks to facilitate outreach for a plan of action.

10. Goal: A good plan requires a motivating goal. A plan that is intended to capture the attention, interest, and imagination of the global public will need to be both inspiring and convincing. Coherent theory, careful analysis and better measures can generate conviction. Whatever its form, the goal will need to universalize the principle of human dignity as the common interest of all humanity. The inspiration can be generated by a compelling vision, such as doubling the welfare of human beings on a sustainable basis. The conference can work to formulate and widely project that goal.

Almaty Conference

Objective

The Almaty conference was part of the collaborative effort a several leading international organizations to develop a framework for a new paradigm of human-centered development capable of addressing the pressing challenges confronting humanity today. The conference examined core elements of an alternative paradigm at the level of theory, institutions and public policies. The conclusions of this conference constituted the basis for subsequent events focusing on conditions, strategies and steps for the transition to a new paradigm.

Themes

Having confirmed the need, opportunity and benefits that can be derived from collaborative work on these pressing global challenges, the next step is to bring together participating organizations for substantive in-depth discussions to establish the basis for a comprehensive, integrated approach to global issues.

The Almaty conference brought together representatives of the New Paradigm group with other policy and research institutions and universities, including ILO, UNESCO, UNDP, New Millennium Project, Inter-Academy Panel, ICSU, OECD, TWAS, ALLEA and several European and national academies for a more in-depth examination and discussion of each of these 10 focal points of work.

The Almaty conference focused on some or all of the following important issues:

  1. Deep Drivers of Change: Deep drivers of social change are altering the configuration of economic, social and political forces and preparing the ground for quantum level changes. The rise of China and India, rising social tensions resulting from unemployment and inequality, climate instability, and rising demand for relevant higher education are just a few of the many forces whose future impact needs to be carefully assessed and factored.
  2. New Economic, Social, Political and Juridical Theory: The insufficiency of prevailing economic and social theory is becoming increasingly apparent to thinkers, policy-makers and the general public. Political economic theory has to be directed to maximize human security, welfare and social equity. Existing concepts have been critiqued and found faulty and inadequate by WAAS, Club of Rome, World Futures Council and many other organizations. The outlines of alternative theory are urgently needed to provide the basis for a new policy agenda capable of addressing the economic and social challenges. 
  3. Integration of Economy & Ecology: A sustainable future necessitates an integration of economic growth with ecology to identify sustainable models and strategies for economic development that maximize human welfare, while minimumizing demands on the environment. The work of Green Cross International, Club of Rome and World Futures Council offers important insights that need to be integrated and synthesized into a comprehensive set of policies.
  4. Employment: Employment, especially among youth, has become the number one social, economic and political issue in many countries, yet existing policies are grossly inadequate to address this challenge. In a market economy, employment is the economic equivalent of the right to vote in democracy. Without it, social stability and human security cannot be ensured. Human-centered models, strategies and policies are needed to redirect investments and redistribute rewards.
  5. New Measures: A new paradigm requires new measures which more accurately reflect the impact of human activity on sustainable human welfare. The consortium needs to review and adopt the most effective set of measures to replace the false and misleading indices by which public policies are guided and evaluated.
  6. Rule of Law, Human Rights & Values: Science cannot be value-neutral. It must accept responsibility for optimizing social outcomes. A new paradigm implies the pursuit of new or higher order values. The prevailing governance by plutocracy must be replaced by true democratic principles of governance based on fundamental human rights.
  7. Global Governance: Humanity has irrevocably entered the phase where national level institutions, strategies and initiatives must be complemented by effective global level political institutions, laws and public policies.
  8. Process of Development: A major shift in public policy requires a deeper understanding of the social, political and constitutive processes by which society actually evolves from one paradigm to the next.
  9. Reinventing Education: None of humanity's pressing challenges can be effectively addressed without radical improvements in accessibility, quality and relevance of education. A new paradigm in human development requires a new paradigm in education.
  10. Social Responsibility of Science: Scientific and technological advances have been the source of remarkable new opportunities and growing problems. The scientific community can no longer afford to insulate itself from the social consequences and policy implications of its discoveries.  

Organizers

  1. Al-Farabi Kazakh National University
  2. World Academy of Art & Science
  3. World University Consortium

Co-Organizers (TBC)

  1. Club de Madrid
  2. Club of Rome
  3. Green Cross International
  4. World Future Council
  5. Foundation for Culture of Peace
  6. International Association of University Presidents
  7. Library of Alexandria
  8. Montenegrin Academy of Sciences & Arts
  9. Nizami Ganjavi International Center
  10. Partnership for Change
  11. Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems
  12. Dag Hammarskjöld University College of International Relations and Diplomacy

Organizations to be Invited

  1. ILO
  2. UNESCO
  3. UNDP
  4. OECD
  5. European Movement International
  6. Future World Foundation
  7. Institute for Cultural Diplomacy
  8. Institute of Economy, Russian Academy of Sciences
  9. Moscow State Institute of International Relations 
  10. World-watch Institute
  11. Other institutions in Kazakhstan

Almaty Conference Program 

The Almaty conference examined core elements of an alternative paradigm for human development at the level of theory, institutions and public policies. The format combined plenary sessions with four inter-linked parallel tracks focusing on issues related to economics, ecology, governance and human development. The parallel sessions examined interdependencies between these four sets of issues.

November 5, 2014 Events
09:30 - 10:00 REGISTRATION
10:00 - 11:15 INAUGURAL SESSION
Venue: Main Conference Hall
Welcoming speeches:
Galym Mutanov – Rector, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University
Kassym-Jomart Tokayev – Chairman, Senate of the Parliament of the Republic of Kazakhstan
«G-Global Initiative»
Akhmetzhan Yessimov – Mayor, Almaty City
Heitor Gurgulino de Souza (Brazil) - President, World Academy of Art & Science and President, World University Consortium
Ivo Šlaus (Croatia) – Honorary President, World Academy of Art & Science
«Need for a New Paradigm»
Garry Jacobs (India) – CEO, World Academy of Art & Science; Chairman of the Board & CEO, World University Consortium
«New Paradigm Progress Report»
Olzhas Suleimenov – President, “Culture” Kazakhstan Foundation for UNESCO
11:15 - 11:45 Coffee-break
11:45 - 13:00 DEEP DRIVERS & BARRIERS TO PARADIGM CHANGE
Parallel sessions:
TRACK 1. Demography, Economy & Ecology
Venue: Conference Hall ? 2
Moderators:
Roberto Peccei (USA) – Vice-President, Club of Rome
Akhmetkal Medeu – Head, Institute of Geography, Committee of Scences of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Republic of Kazakhstan
Presenter:
Adam Koniuszewski (Switzerland) – Chief Operating Officer, Green Cross International
TRACK 2. Social & Cultural
Venue: Conference Hall ? 4
Moderators:
Emil Constantinescu (Romania) – Former President of Romania
Kuatzhan Ualyev – Executive Secretary of the Ministry of Culture and Sports of the Republic of Kazakhstan
Presenter:
Ruben Nelson (Canada) – Executive Director, Foresight Canada
TRACK 3. Intellectual, Scientific & Technological
Venue: Conference Hall ? 1
Moderators:
Pushpa Bhargava (India) – Chairman, Council for Social Development, Southern Regional Centre
Murat Zhurinov – President, National Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Kazakhstan
Presenter:
Juri Engelbrecht (Estonia) – Vice-President, Estonian Academy of Sciences
TRACK 4. Governance & Security
Venue: Conference Hall ? 3
Moderators:
Tibor Toth (Austria) – Former Executive Head, Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization
Meruert Abuseitova – Head Office, Institute of Oriental Studies, Sciences Committee of the Ministry of Education and science of the Republic of Kazakhstan
Presenter:
David Harries (Canada) – Member, Board of Directors, Global Initiatives Project and Proteus
13:00 - 14:30 Lunch
14:30 - 16:00 REPORTS OF THE PARALLEL SESSIONS
Venue: Main Conference Hall
Moderators:
Nebojša Neškovic (Serbia) – Secretary General, World Academy of Art & Science
Tlekkabul Ramazanov – Vice-Rector for Research and Innovation, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University
16:00 - 16:30 Coffee-break
16:30 - 17:30 HUMAN RIGHTS & RESPONSIBILITIES
Venue: Main Conference Hall
Moderators:
Winston Nagan (USA) – Chairman of the Board of Trustees, World Academy of Art & Science
Igor Rogov – Chairman, The Constitutional Council of the Republic of Kazakhstan
Presenter:
Winston Nagan (USA) – Chairman of the Board of Trustees, World Academy of Art & Science
Discussion
17:30 - 18:30 FUTURE VISIONS
Venue: Main Conference Hall
Moderator:
Heitor Gurgulino de Souza (Brazil) - President, World Academy of Art & Science and President, World University Consortium
Presenters:
Emil Constantinescu (Romania) – Former President of Romania
Alexander Likhotal (Switzerland) – President, Green Cross International
Roberto Peccei (USA) – Vice-President, Club of Rome
Alberto Zucconi (Italy) – Secretary General, World University Consortium
November 6, 2014 Events
09:00 - 09:45 FUTURE VISIONS
Venue: Main Conference Hall
Moderator:
Heitor Gurgulino de Souza (Brazil) - President, World Academy of Art & Science and President, World University Consortium
Rovshan Muradov (Azerbaijan) – Secretary General, Nizami Ganjavi International Center
Diogo Pinto (Belgium) – Secretary General, European Movement International
Ingrid Stange (Norway) – Founder and Chair, Partnership For Change
09:45 - 11:15 CAPITAL & RESOURCES FOR NEW PARADIGM
TRACK 1. Natural Capital
Place: Conference Hall ? 1
Moderators:
Momir Djurovic (Montenegro) – President, Montenegrin Academy of Sciences and Arts
Ali Abyshev – First Vice President, Association of Kazakhstan Universities
Presenter:
Andrey Avramenko (Russia) – Chair, International Complex Problems of Nature Management and Ecology, MSIIR
Timi Ecimovic(Slovenia) – Chairman, SEM Institute for Climate Change
TRACK 2. Human Capital
Place: Conference Hall ? 4
Moderators:
J. Martin Ramirez (Spain) – Head, Center for Conflict Studies, Universidad Nebrija Madrid
Rollan Seysenbayev – President, International Abai Club
Presenter:
Chandana Chakrabarti (India) – Director, Sukriti Consultancy
TRACK 3. Social Capital
Place: Conference Hall ? 3
Moderators:
Alberto Zucconi (Italy) – Secretary General, World University Consortium
Bibigul Zheksenbay - President, Club of the Main Editors of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the 7th Channel
Presenter:
Winston Nagan (USA) – Chairman of the Board of Trustees, World Academy of Art & Science
TRACK 4. Economic Capital
Place: Conference Hall ? 2
Moderators:
Yehuda Kahane (Israel) – Head, Akirov Institute for Business and the Environment, Tel Aviv University
Sabden Orazaly – Head, The Union of Scientists
Presenter:
Robert Hoffman (Canada) – President & Cofounder, «What If? Technologies Inc.»
11:15 - 11:45 Coffee-break
11:45 - 13:00 REPORTS OF THE PARALLEL SESSIONS
Venue: Main Conference Hall
Moderator:
Pushpa Bhargava (India) – Chairman, Council for Social Development, Southern Regional Centre
13:00 - 14:30 Lunch
14:30 - 16:00 OPPORTUNITIES & SOLUTIONS
TRACK 1: Employment & Human Welfare
Place: Conference Hall ? 2
Moderators:
Ivo Šlaus (Croatia) – Honorary President, World Academy of Art & Science
Seidakhmet Kuttykadam – Chief Editor «Mysl» magazine
Presenter:
Garry Jacobs (India) – CEO, World Academy of Art & Science; Chairman of the Board & CEO, World University Consortium
TRACK 2: Inclusive Growth & Sustainable Development
Place: Conference Hall ? 1
Moderators:
Adam Koniuszewski (Switzerland) – Chief Operating Officer, Green Cross International
Akmaral Arystanbekova – Ambassador-at-large, Kazakhstan’s First Permanent Representative to UN
Presenter:
Valery Terin (Russia) – Professor of Philosophy, MSIIR
TRACK 3: Democracy
Place: Conference Hall ? 4
Moderators:
Winston Nagan (USA) – Chairman of the Board of Trustees, World Academy of Art & Science
Nurtore Zhusyp – Chief Editor, «Aikyn» newspaper
Presenter:
Saulo Jose Casali Bahia (Brazil) – Federal Judge & Member National Justice Council
TRACK 4: Global Governance & International Security
Place: Conference Hall ? 3
Moderators:
David Harries (Canada) – Member, Board of Directors, Global Initiatives Project and Proteus
Kuralai Baizakova – Head, Resource and Information Center on NATO, Institute for Security and Cooperation Problems
Presenter:
Boris Shmelev (Russia) – Director, Center of Comparative Political Studies, Institute of Economics
16:00 - 16:30 Coffee-break
16:30 - 17:30 REPORTS OF THE PARALLEL SESSIONS AND DISCUSSION
Venue: Main Conference Hall
Moderators:
Robert Berg (USA) – Former Senior Advisor, U.N.
Mukhambetkali Burkitbayev – First Vice- Rector, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University
November 7, 2014 Events
09:00 - 10:30 NEW PARADIGM IN EDUCATION
Venue:Main Conference Hall
Moderators:
Galym Mutanov– Rector, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University
Heitor Gurgulino de Souza (Brazil) - President, World Academy of Art & Science and President, World University Consortium
Presenter:
Alberto Zucconi (Italy) – Secretary General, World University Consortium
Panelists:
Emil Constantinescu (Romania) – Former President of Romania
Momir Djurovic (Montenegro) – President, Montenegrin Academy of Sciences and Arts
Juri Engelbrecht (Estonia) – Vice-President, Estonian Academy of Sciences
Roberto Peccei (USA) – Vice-President, Club of Rome
Murat Isakhanov – Head, Department of Educational Programs of the Environmental Project "Zhandanu"
10:30 - 11:00 Coffee-break
11:00 - 13:00 PATHWAYS TO A NEW PARADIGM
TRACK 1: Economic Theory & Modeling a New Paradigm
Place: Conference Hall ? 1
Moderators:
Yehuda Kahane (Israel) – Head, Akirov Institute for Business and the Environment, Tel Aviv University
Sergei Lazarev– The Head, Cluster Office of UNESCO in Almaty
Presenter:
Robert Hoffman (Canada) – President & Cofounder, «What If? Technologies Inc.»
TRACK 2: Revamping Institutions & Public Policy
Place: Conference Hall ? 2
Moderators:
Diogo Pinto (Belgium) – Secretary General, European Movement International
Shamshydyn Patteyev – Chief Editor, “Turkistan” newspaper
Presenter:
Tibor Toth (Austria) – Ambassador, Former Executive Head, Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization
TRACK 3: Building Awareness & Support for Paradigm Change
Place: Conference Hall ? 3
Moderators:
Ruben Nelson (Canada) – Executive Director, Foresight Canada
Vlastemil Samek – UNDPI Representative
Presenter:
Orlyn Kringstad (USA) – Executive Director, Partnership for Change
TRACK 4: Unleashing Social Innovation & Initiative
Place: Conference Hall ? 4
Moderators:
Chandana Chakrabarti (India) – Director, Sukriti Consultancy
Zarema Shaukenova – Head, Institute of Philosophy and Political Studies, Science Committee of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Republic of Kazakhstan
Presenter:
Ingrid Stange (Norway) – Founder and Chair, Partnership For Change
13:00 - 14:30 Lunch
14:30 - 16:00 Reports of the parallel sessions and discussion
Venue: Main Conference Hall
Moderators:
Alexander Likhotal (Switzerland) – President, Green Cross International
Sholpan Dzhamanbalayeva – Vice-Rector for Social Development
16:00 - 16:30 Coffee-break
16:30 - 17:30 NEXT STEPS AND CONCLUSIONS
Moderators:
Heitor Gurgulino de Souza (Brazil) - President, World Academy of Art & Science and President, World University Consortium
Galym Mutanov– Rector, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University
Presenters:
Ivo Šlaus (Croatia) – Honorary President, World Academy of Art & Science
Garry Jacobs (India) – CEO, World Academy of Art & Science; Chairman of the Board & CEO, World University Consortium

Message from The President of the Republic of Kazakhstan Nursultan Nazarbayev

Background Papers

New Paradigm

  1. Ten points on New Paradigm by Kassym Jomart-Tokayev
  2. New Paradigm Quest by Alexander Likhotal

Ecology & Economy

  1. Energy Related Environment by Momir Djurovic
  2. Demoraphy, Economy and Ecology Presentation by Adam Koniuszewski
  3. Social Innovation Presentation by Adam Koniuszewski

Human Rights, Rule of Law & Governance

  1. Human Rights and Responsibilities by Winston Nagan
  2. New Paradigm Thinking Behind the Global Rule of Law and Fundamental Human Rights by Winston Nagan
  3. Proposed Declaration of Human Responsibilities by Bohdan Hawrylyshyn and Alexandra Telychko

Human Capital and Education

  1. Human Capital For A New Paradigm: Some Introductory Remarks by J. Martin Ramirez

Implementation

  1. Pathways to a New Paradigm by Orlyn Kringstad

Future Visions

  1. European Movement International Vision of the Future by Diogo Pinto
  2. Future Visions by Neal King
  3. Future Visions - Green Cross International by Alexander Likhotal

Potential Partners

  1. 29 Organizations to Know About as Potential Partners or Competitors by Michael Marien
  2. The Security & Sustainability Guide: An Overview by Michael Marien

 

Resolution

International Conference "The new paradigm of sustainable human development. G-Global - global dialogue format"

Participants of the international conference “New Paradigm of Sustainable Human Development. G-Global - A New Form of Global Dialogue” held at the Al-Farabi Kazakh National University (Almaty, Kazakhstan), 5-7 November 2014, supporting the decision of the previous conferences at the United Nations (Geneva), the Library of Alexandria, the World Academy of Sciences (Trieste), the Montenegrin Academy of Sciences and Arts (Podgorica), University of California at Berkeley, Washington, Ottawa, and Nizami Ganjavi International Center (Baku) on the multidimensional global crises confronting humanity today, and aware of the urgent need to revise the existing development paradigm by joint efforts and to create more effective mechanisms for the implementation of the concept of sustainable development, adopt this resolution with the following provisions:

  1. The conference participants recognize that uncontrolled globalization generates instability and crises in the social, political, military, economic and financial sectors and agree on the need for urgent measures to formulate a new concept and approach for sustainable development of the whole world. The rapid pace of technological development has outstripped the speed of adaptation by societies and cultures, resulting in rising levels of turbulence, conflict, inequality, unemployment and social alienation. Intensive technological development, stressful social change and increasing population pose global threats to human society and the health of the biosphere.
  2. The conference supports the ideas reflected in the address of the President of Kazakhstan N.A. Nazarbayev to the participants of the Forum and recommends employing unique communication platform G-Global as efficient guide for achieving sustainable human development.
  3. The conference participants emphasize the need for transition to a human-centered development paradigm based on universal human rights and responsibilities, global rule of law, and democratic institutions for global governance.
  4. The conference strongly endorses the ten principles for a new paradigm presented at the conference, including the shift in emphasis from quantitative growth to quality of life, environmental preservation as a prerequisite for sustainable human development, the central role of human capital in sustainable development, the need to bridge the social inequalities gap at the global level, priority attention to unemployment and drinking water shortages, respect for cultural polycentricity, mutually beneficial cooperation on the basis of equality, creation of a global security environment based on nuclear disarmament, education and social justice as counter measures to extremism, and domestic stability through a democratic framework.
  5. The participants of the conference from the aspect of sustainable development aware that new paradigm must reflect the crucial role of creation of a global security environment based on nuclear disarmament, mutually beneficial cooperation based on equality and social justice education.
  6. The paradigm should maintain the development of domestic political stability through a democratic framework as a counter measure to terrorism, separatism and religious extremism at which demographic growth provokes unemployment, drinking water shortages and conflict potential in the world politics.
  7. The new paradigm needs to balance economic growth with natural resource constraints and reconcile the needs and aspirations of individuals for consumption and social advancement with the limitations imposed by the carrying capacities of the earth’s biosphere.
  8. The conference supports the establishment of a global network of institutions to monitor, forecast and analyze current political, economic, environmental and social forces and trends, to develop long-term strategic plans and formulate a new paradigm for the sustainable evolution of human society on the planet.
  9. The international mass media and communication technologies should play a leading role projecting a practically achievable and sustainable vision of the future world and strategies by which humanity can realize it.
  10. The conference participants recognize that conducting an in-depth analysis of globalization processes requires fundamental changes in our educational system to promote trans-disciplinary theoretical concepts and models and inter-disciplinary approaches for problem-solving. Economic theory needs to be integrated with ecological, political and sociological concepts to ensure that economic development promotes individual human welfare and well-being and stable, sustainable societies.
  11. A concerted international effort is required to enhance the role of educational institutions as instruments of conscious social evolution by expanding access to education at all levels, enhancing quality, promoting social integration of universities with society to ensure relevance of education, fostering academic mobility, coordinating joint activities, extending international relations between universities, and involving universities in establishment of educational standards at pre-university and other levels. In order to increase the adaptability and resilience of present and future generations, it is equally necessary to introduce pedagogical methods that foster active participative learning, team collaboration, independent thinking, innovation, leadership and socially-responsible individuality.
  12. It is also essential to support modernization of production methods and systems to maximize natural resource productivity and recycling and to minimize ecological damage. Emphasis on knowledge-intensive technologies and services is needed to aid the transition from an industrial economy to a knowledge-based service economy.
  13. The conference participants support efforts to cooperate in the frame of the UNAI Program, the UNESCO Program on environment and environmental education to actively promote the “Model Plan for Sustainable Development of the Universities” in all countries and to attract other international and non-governmental organizations in order to spread sustainable development programs within the frame of G-Global.

November 5


INAUGURAL SESSION



Kassym Jomart Tokayev
G-Global Initiative



Heitor Gurgulino de Souza



Ivo Šlaus
Need for a New Paradigm



Garry Jacobs
New Paradigm Progress Report



Garry Jacobs



Ivo Šlaus

DEEP DRIVERS & BARRIERS TO PARADIGM CHANGE



Track 1: Demography, Economy & Ecology



Track 2: Social and cultural factors



Track 3: Intellectual, Scientific & Technological



Track 4: Governance & Security

PLENARY REPORT ON DEEP DRIVERS & BARRIERS TO PARADIGM CHANGE

HUMAN RIGHTS & RESPONSIBILITIES



Alexandra Telychko



Winston Nagan

FUTURE VISIONS



Emil Constantinescu



Alexander Likhotal



Roberto Peccei



Alberto Zucconi



Diogo Pinto



Orlyn Krings

November 6


CAPITAL & RESOURCES FOR NEW PARADIGM



Track 2. Human Capital



Track 3. Social Capital



Track 4. Economic Capital

PLENARY REPORT ON CAPITAL & RESOURCES FOR NEW PARADIGM

OPPORTUNITIES & SOLUTIONS



Track 1. Employment & Human Welfare



Track 2. Inclusive Growth & Sustainable Development



Track 3. Democracy



Track 4. Global Governance & International Security

PLENARY REPORT ON OPPORTUNITIES & CHALLENGES

November 7


NEW PARADIGM IN EDUCATION

PATHWAYS TO A NEW PARADIGM



Track 1. Economic Theory & Modeling a New Paradigm



Track 2. Revamping Institutions & Public Policy



Track 3. Building Awareness & Support for Paradigm Change



Track 4. Unleashing Social Innovation & Initiative

PLENARY REPORT ON PATHWAYS TO A NEW PARADIGM